SIS II

The Schengen Information System (SIS) is a large-scale IT system that supports public security and the exchange of information on people and objects between national law enforcement, border control, customs, visa and judicial authorities.

As people and goods can move in the Schengen Area without being checked at internal borders, SIS is used by security officials to help keep people safe and counter cross-border crime.

SIS supports authorities to ensure Europe’s internal security, while respecting data protection requirements.

At the end of 2017, SIS contained over 76 million alerts and more than 243 000 ‘hits’ on alerts were registered. Statistical data shows that in 2017 SIS was searched more than 5.1 billion times in total by all Member States, 1.2 billion times more (i.e. 30 % more) than in 2016.

After two years of intensive efforts, in the beginning of 2018 eu-LISA successfully launched the SIS Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) platform. SIS AFIS meets the demands of the European law enforcement community to have an advanced tool, at EU level, enabling the identification of persons of interest by their fingerprints alone.

The SIS reform package will introduce technical and operational improvements to the system (such as the introduction of additional categories of alerts and the expansion of the list of objects for which alerts can be issued) to further strengthen the operational effectiveness and efficiency of SIS. eu-LISA, as the operational manager of the system, is driving forward such improvements, utilising its skills and capabilities to further advance Schengen cooperation.

SIS II and eu-LISA: supporting safety and security in the Schengen area​​

SIS II 2016 Statistics - Factsheet​

Council Regulation No 2007/533/JHA on the establishment of SIS II 

SIS II

SIS II

 
In May 2013, eu-LISA became responsible of the operational management of the second generation Schengen Information System (SIS II) which entered into operation on 09 April 2013 replacing SIS1. SIS II, the largest information system for public security in Europe, allows information exchanges between national border control, customs and police authorities ensuring that the free movement of people within the EU can take place in a safe environment. It also contains alerts on missing persons, in particular children, as well as information on certain property, such as banknotes, cars, vans, firearms and identity documents that may have been stolen, misappropriated or lost.

The countries currently using the system  are the EU Member States (except for Croatia, Ireland and the UK)  and  Associated Countries Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

 
VIS

VIS

 
In December 2012, eu-LISA became responsible of the operational management of the Visa Information System (VIS). It is a system for the exchange of visa data among Schengen Member States. VIS connects consulates in non-EU countries and all external border crossing points of Schengen States. It processes data and decisions relating to applications for short-stay visas to visit, or to transit through, the Schengen Area. The system can perform biometric matching, primarily of fingerprints, for identification and verification purposes.

The countries using the system are the Schengen states, namely the EU Member States - except UK, Ireland, Romania, Bulgaria, Cyprus and Croatia and  Associated Countries Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

 
EURODAC

EURODAC

 
In 2013, eu-LISA became responsible for the management of EURODAC  (European Asylum Dactyloscopy Database) that helps, by matching fingerprints to make it easier for EU States to determine responsibility for examining an asylum application by comparing fingerprint datasets.
Since its creation in 2003 , EURODAC has been used for asylum purposes only: when someone applies for asylum, no matter where they are in the EU or in any of the countries participating in this cooperation, their fingerprints are transmitted to the central database.
Hence EURODAC facilitates the judicious and transparent receipt and processing of asylum applications from those who may need the protection afforded by Europe.

The countries using the system are the 28 EU Member States and  Associated Countries Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.